“Join my team” pitches – There are plenty of real ways to be your own boss and work for yourself. Unfortunately, these opportunities are often drowned out by the “join my team” pitches common at multi-level marketing jobs (MLMs). While not necessarily a scam in all cases, many of these companies require you to buy product, which means you’ll end up spending far more money than you’ll ever earn. If there is more money to be made by recruiting others to join your team than there is than by actually selling the product, it’s probably an MLM and best to just stay away.
I am regularly asked for recommendations on worldwide work from home jobs available outside the US. The problem is with so many online scams you have to be careful to only find trustworthy sites that actually pay. As a result, I have put together a list of worldwide jobs and gigs allowing you to work from anywhere no matter where you are located. I will add to this list as I come across more sites that I trust.

Thank you for the response. I’ve been looking into a lot of them and most pan out as scams or “front Companies” that either have been shut down or have horrible reviews(if any). If I happen to find a legit one…. I’ll let you know so that you can offer this info to anyone else that are interested in this type of work. One that I found as a verified scam is “tiny details”, which has changed their name to “Artisan Miniatures”.


Because these small charges can add up quickly, you will probably want to withdraw larger amounts than you might normally do at home — so be sure you have a safe, well-concealed place to keep your cash. (See Money Safety Tips for Travelers for more.) When deciding how much to withdraw, try to choose an uneven amount (180 euros rather than 200, for instance) so you don’t wind up with huge bills that you’ll have trouble breaking.
Any time you spend money in another country you’re going to pay something for converting U.S. dollars into the local currency. This is true whether you exchange cash at a money changer, withdraw local currency at an ATM, or make purchases with your credit card. Sometimes, you don’t even realize it because the bank simply gives you a less favorable exchange rate and pockets the difference. Other times, they charge you a percentage of the money changed in addition to the hidden profit they earn on the exchange rate.
1. Ally: Strictly speaking, Ally does charge a 1% fee, but because it’s low, I thought it was worth mentioning. Per their FAQ page, “If you use an ATM in a foreign country, you may be charged a fee of up to 1% of the transaction amount for the currency conversion and/or cross border transaction. Ally only reimburses ATM fees charged by other banks if the ATM is in the US.”
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